Thursday, May 30, 2013

Dinner tables sold out!

The last table of the 80 tables we offered for the OMA Dinner is taken. We are greatly impressed with the tremendous support shown by our old boys. 
However, reservation can still be made but from today, names given will be placed under waiting list. 
I look forward to a very memorable dinner in school. For updates, visit the blog often. 
QUIS UT DEUS. 

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

St Michael's Never Rests.. Even During The School Holidays

Sheltered from the elements -workers fixing a covered walkway from the staffroom to the side of school main building. 
Brother U Paul Building (Form Six block) given a fresh coat of paint.  A refreshing start for the students when school reopens on 10 June 2013. 
SMI tuckshop (what tuckshop?). That's what we called during those years. The first tuckshop used to be at the shed (demolished) behind the mosque. The foodcourt is undergoing extension work, making it a bit spacious. 
In deep discussion...Board of Governors led by Tan Sri Lee Oi Hian (left) addressing issues at St Michael's after its meeting. With him are Brother Matthew, Brother Vincent and Mr Victor from SK St Michael 2.
Mr Adrian Tsen and Mr Joseph Michael Lee also sit on the Board.
Troop camp for scouts starts today, May 28 for three days. Some 50 scouts are taking part. Senior scouts led by Adrian  Aw are training and supervising the juniors. 
Enough supply for the boy scouts.. leaving the comfort of home for a good cause. 
Asst. Troop Leader Adrian Aw keeping an eagle eye on his charges.
Michaelian Chinese Orchestra members are also having their workshop cum camp in school. Look how enthusiastic they are.
Rare nowadays to see youngsters playing the er-hu, a two-stringed bowed musical instrument.  
Reporting from St Michael's Ipoh, your alma mater.
Happy Holidays and Best Wishes from,
Peter Khiew

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

SMI In Images

Teachers' Day celebration at SMI. A cake-cutting ceremony with members from the PIBG.
Zone-level solar boat competition. Our creation, "Bolt" not only managed to impress the judges and other competitors but we walked home with the 2nd prize. Well done! Thanks to Pn Wan Norliza, Pn Seri Ayu and fellow Michaelians for the initiative and encouragement. 
The Michaelian family... our participants and teachers posing after receiving their certificates from the Education Department.

Bravo...Fifth former Edward Kwan with his trophy. 
Our boys at the Pavilion, revising for their mid-year exams.
Our debaters who were 1st runners-up at the Rotary Debate 2013. From left (Edwin Tan,  Bryan Cheah, Amardas Sandu and Eric John). With them are the Principal and Mr Rajan (adviser). 

Lively... a Form Five lesson on literature in progress. 

The Class of 68' visiting St Michael's after a lapse of 45 years! Taking them for a tour around the school were Brother Matthew Bay and Mr Joseph Michael Lee.

Brother Matthew handing over Brother U Paul Scholarship to financially challenged pupils. The good work of the Brothers started some 300 years ago and it still prevails today.  

"Good schools, like good societies and good families, celebrate and cherish diversity."  Deborah Meier

Onward Michaelians! Valiant and True.

Sunday, May 19, 2013

Extreme Road To School ...

Children walk along a narrow mountain road to get to school in Bijie, southwest China's Guizhou Province. Banpo Elementary School is located halfway up a mountain and each day students from the nearby Genguan village have to climb a narrow winding footpath cut into the
 mountainside...Picture: HAP/Quirky China News / Rex Features
Children walk along a narrow mountain road to get to school in Bijie, southwest China's Guizhou Province. Banpo Elementary School is located halfway up a mountain and each day students from the nearby Genguan village have to climb a narrow winding footpath cut into the mountainside...Picture: HAP/Quirky China News / Rex Features
A boy climbs a wire across a river to get to
 school in Pintu Gabang, Indonesia. These children have to tightrope walk 30 feet above a flowing river to get to their class on time and then walk a further seven miles through the forest to their school in the town of Padang...Picture: Panjalu Images / Barcroft Media
A boy climbs a wire across a river to get to school in Pintu Gabang, Indonesia. These children have to tightrope walk 30 feet above a flowing river to get to their class on time and then walk a further seven miles through the forest to their school in the town of Padang...Picture: Panjalu Images / Barcroft Media
Each day 20 determined pupils have to cross the local river like circus performers after the suspension bridge collapsed in heavy rain.Picture: Panjalu Images / Barcroft Media
Each day 20 determined pupils have to cross the local river like circus performers after the suspension bridge collapsed in heavy rain.Picture: Panjalu Images / Barcroft Media
The footpath is cut through the cliff face at points. It is less than 0.5 metres wide in places so the children have to walk single file and press themselves into the side of the mountain is someone wants to squeeze past. According to headmaster Xu Liangfan the school has 49 students.Picture: HAP/Quirky China News / Rex Features
The footpath is cut through the cliff face at points. It is less than 0.5 metres wide in places so the children have to walk single file and press themselves into the side of the mountain is someone wants to squeeze past. According to headmaster Xu Liangfan the school has 49 students.Picture: HAP/Quirky China News / Rex Features

Teacher Li Guilin helps children climb one of five rickety wooden ladders to reach their school on a cliff 2,800m above sea level, in Gangluo County, Sichuan Province, China. The children would spend the week at the school before repeating
 the dangerous journey in order to get home for the weekend...Picture: Quirky China News / Rex Features
Teacher Li Guilin helps children climb one of five rickety wooden ladders to reach their school on a cliff 2,800m above sea level, in Gangluo County, Sichuan Province, China. The children would spend the week at the school before repeating the dangerous journey in order to get home for the weekend...Picture: Quirky China News / Rex Features
The wooden ladders on the approach to the school have been replaced with a metal staircase that makes the ascent much easier and safer.Picture: Quirky China News / Rex Features
The wooden ladders on the approach to the school have been replaced with a metal staircase that makes the ascent much easier and safer.Picture: Quirky China News / Rex Features
A school child crosses ane aqueduct that separates Suro Village and Plempungan Village in Java, Indonesia.The children decided to use the aqueduct on their journey to school as a shortcut, even though it wasn't made for people to walk on...Picture: Panjalu Images / Barcroft Media
A school child crosses ane aqueduct that separates Suro Village and Plempungan Village in Java, Indonesia.The children decided to use the aqueduct on their journey to school as a shortcut, even though it wasn't made for people to walk on...Picture: Panjalu Images / Barcroft Media
Even though it is dangerous, the children say would rather use it than walk a distance over six kilometers.Picture: Panjalu Images / Barcroft Media
Even though it is dangerous, the children say would rather use it than walk a distance over six kilometers.Picture: Panjalu Images / Barcroft Media
To get to school each day children living in a mountainous village in China have to cross a valley hundreds of metres deep on a rickety, homemade cable car. Villagers who live in Decun village in southwest China's Guizhou Province used to have to make the journey on foot, which took five hours, but in 2002 local man Hui Defang built a simple cableway.Picture: Quirky China News / Rex Features
To get to school each day children living in a mountainous village in China have to cross a valley hundreds of metres deep on a rickety, homemade cable car. Villagers who live in Decun village in southwest China's Guizhou Province used to have to make the journey on foot, which took five hours, but in 2002 local man Hui Defang built a simple cableway. Picture: Quirky China News / Rex Features

Gulu Village Primary School pupil Shen Qicai rides a donkey as his his grandfather accompanies him. Gulu is a remote Chinese mountain village located in a national park filled with canyons, sheer precipices and overhanging rocks. The village'?s primary school is probably the most remote in the world. Lying halfway up a mountain, it takes five hours to climb from the base to the school...Picture: Sipa Press / Rex Features
Gulu Village Primary School pupil Shen Qicai rides a donkey as his his grandfather accompanies him. Gulu is a remote Chinese mountain village located in a national park filled with canyons, sheer precipices and overhanging rocks. The village'?s primary school is probably the most remote in the world. Lying halfway up a mountain, it takes five hours to climb from the base to the school...Picture: Sipa Press / Rex Features
The children who attend the
 school face a dangerous journey to reach it and must traverse a path that is only 1ft 4ins wide and which has a sheer drop on one side.Picture: Sipa Press / Rex Features
The children who attend the school face a dangerous journey to reach it and must traverse a path that is only 1ft 4ins wide and which has a sheer drop on one side.Picture: Sipa Press / Rex Features
Zhao Jihong and her four-year-old daughter Zi Yi cross a broken bridge in the snow to get to school in Dujiangyan, Sichuan Province, China. Shawan village's only connection to the outside is a wooden bridge. However, this bridge was damaged by flooding, leaving it extremely precarious and leaning dangerously to one side.Picture: Quirky China News / Rex Features
Zhao Jihong and her four-year-old daughter Zi Yi cross a broken bridge in the snow to get to school in Dujiangyan, Sichuan Province, China. Shawan village's only connection to the outside is a wooden bridge. However, this bridge was damaged by flooding, leaving it extremely precarious and leaning dangerously to one side.Picture: Quirky China News / Rex Features
A woman carries a desk while a young girl carries a chair to school in Macheng, Hubei province, China, where primary school pupils have to bring their own desks and chairsPicture: Imaginechina / Rex Features
A woman carries a desk while a young girl carries a chair to school in Macheng, Hubei province, China, where primary school pupils have to bring their own desks and chairs. Picture: Imaginechina / Rex Features
Five-year-old Lu Siling rides with her desk on the back of her mother's motorbike on the first day of school in Macheng, China. There are 5,000 pupils at the schools in the town, but only about 2,000 desks. So more than 3,000 children have to go to school with desks and chairs, like their parents' generation. Some children even use their parents' old desks.Picture: China Foto Press / Barcroft Media
Five-year-old Lu Siling rides with her desk on the back of her mother's motorbike on the first day of school in Macheng, China. There are 5,000 pupils at the schools in the town, but only about 2,000 desks. So more than 3,000 children have to go to school with desks and chairs, like their parents' generation. Some children even use their parents' old desks.Picture: China Foto Press / Barcroft Media
Students carry their belongings as they trek back to school from home on a rugged mountain path in Dahua Yao Autonomous County, southwest China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. As the children live in mountains far away from the village school, most of them stay there during the school year and return home for the summer and other holidays.Picture: KeystoneUSA-ZUMA / Rex Features
Students carry their belongings as they trek back to school from home on a rugged mountain path in Dahua Yao Autonomous County, southwest China's Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. As the children live in mountains far away from the village school, most of them stay there during the school year and return home for the summer and other holidays.Picture: KeystoneUSA-ZUMA / Rex Features
Children attend class at the Dongzhong (literally means in cave) primary school at a Miao village in
 Ziyun county, southwest China's Guizhou province. The school is built in a huge, aircraft hanger-sized natural cave, carved out of a mountain over thousands of years by wind, water and seismic shifts.Picture: REUTERS/China Daily
Children attend class at the Dongzhong (literally means in cave) primary school at a Miao village in Ziyun county, southwest China's Guizhou province. The school is built in a huge, aircraft hanger-sized natural cave.

Note: How blessed we are. Thanks Mr Adrian Tsen for the article.

Congrats Brother on your Diamond Jubilee!



Fraternal Congratulations to Brother Matthew Liew fsc on his Diamond Jubilee as a La Salle Brother 1953-2013

Brother Matthew served with distinction as teacher but mostly as headmaster from 1957 to 1985 in various Kuala Lumpur schools and La Salle Canning Garden in Ipoh. He served as Director of Juniors 1967-1981 while Headmaster of La Salle School.
He is affectionately remembered as a dynamic, innovative and caring educationist.
In 1985 at 51 he was appointed Brother Visitor for a period of six years. As Visitor he is remembered as a supremely caring person. His greatest challenge was in 1988 when there was a change in government policy. Brothers holding promotional posts had now to retire at 55.
All hailed his courage in taking the issue even to the highest levels. He fought strenuously to maintain the status quo but all in vain. The major Lasallian schools were affected. It was heart-breaking for Brother Matthew.
In retirement he assisted Brother Andrew Loke at De La Salle Language Institute for some years till his health gave way and he had to opt for a simpler life style.
We wish him God’s continued blessings for the way forward, always convinced the best is yet to come.


Article courtesy of Dato' Brother Vincent Corkery.

Brother Anthony Rogers Wins “Beca Rickshaw Run”

Brother Rogers...evergreen as ever
“La Salle Brother Anthony Rogers proved that he could be the right racer for the ‘beca’ after powering his way to a record in the 1st “Beca Rickshaw Run 2013” held in various cities in the states of Malacca, Penang, Kelantan and Terengganu. The ‘beca’ is a type of cycle rickshaw operated mostly as a tourist attraction in these states.
“After the race Bro Rogers said ‘I am proud to have been part of this endeavor in promoting our heritage and tourism in Malaysia in general. I will definitely do this again next year!’ Born in Penang to a family of teachers, Bro Rogers' close association with the La Salle Brothers began when he was a student of St Xavier's Institution in Penang. These days, the 63-year-old La Salle Brother Director of Malaysia spends most of his time helping the young gain a better footing in life.
“Initiated by the Ministry of Tourism of Malaysia, the ‘Beca Rickshaw Run 2013’ is an event where anyone - Malaysians or foreigners race across various routes in Malaysia. On the way racers encounter anything from monsoon rains to jungle tracks to great plains, and golden beaches to heritage sites and cities. In Malaysia, cycle rickshaws were ubiquitous up to the 1970s in cities. Since then, rapid urbanisation has increased demand for more efficient public transport, resulting in dwindling cycle rickshaw numbers.” 
(Credit: Article and photo from http://thestar.com.my)

Monday, May 13, 2013

Another Exciting Initiative For All Michaelians!



With a kind thought for the financially challenged students at SMI Ipoh, the SMI Alumni Klang Valley is planning another program. It was a golf tournament last year in Ipoh. This time, It's "Green & White" Charity Treasure Hunt. Be game and adventurous! (Michaelians had these traits even in their early years in school).
Visit http://smialumnikv.blogspot.com/ for more details.
Alternatively, call the numbers in the poster.